Tag Archives: Bookkeeping Services for Small Business

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Importance of hire Reliable Bookkeeping Services?

Business owners in need of reliable accounting services should ensure to hire accomplished accountants. It is quite easy to obtain bookkeeping services because there are practicing individuals as well as companies. The work demands in your accounting department will determine the kind of professional to be hired. When looking for reliable bookkeeping services Coral Springs FL accountants are obtainable online

 

At Reliable Bookkeeping Services, we look for long term relationships. Bookkeeping is not the most exciting task and bookkeepers also like excitement and once internal bookkeeper learns all about your business, they stop learning and that leads to boredom and resignation. Other factor that may influence them to move on is a better opportunity or less appreciation by business owner.

 

At Reliable Bookkeeping Services, we will never leave our clients alone, as we believe in building business relationships for longer term. We have been serving clients in different industries, we always stay enthusiastic and excited about new challenges and domains we will be working on for them. And we promise you will never be disappointed.

 

An accountant is useful in doing your taxes and giving advice on financial strategies, bookkeepers are more concern with the daily operational costs and the bills your business incurs. That is, bookkeepers are more concern with your payrolls, invoices, utility bills, and other immediate financial concerns that needs your attention whereas accountants are more concerned with your business’ overall financial health.

 

Having a clear picture of your finances is one of the most crucial steps in running a business, no matter how small you might deem it to be. Hiring a bookkeeper can save your from a potential heartbreak of losing the fruits of all your hard work simply because you tried to do everything on your own.

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Types of Cost Accounting

Cost accounting involves the techniques for:

1. determining the costs of products, processes, projects, etc. in order to report the correct amounts on the financial statements, and
2. assisting management in making decisions and in the planning and control of an organization.
For example, cost accounting is used to compute the unit cost of a manufacturer’s products in order to report the cost of inventory on its balance sheet and the cost of goods sold on its income statement. This is achieved with techniques such as the allocation of manufacturing overhead costs and through the use of process costing, operations costing, and job-order costing systems.
Cost accounting had its roots in manufacturing businesses, but today it extends to service businesses. For example, a bank will use cost accounting to determine the cost of processing a customer’s check and/or a deposit. This in turn may provide management with guidance in the pricing of these services.
While cost accounting is often used within a company to aid in decision making, financial accounting is what the outside investor community typically sees. Financial accounting is a different representation of costs and financial performance that includes a company’s assets and liabilities. Cost accounting can be most beneficial as a tool for management in budgeting and in setting up cost control programs, which can improve net margins for the company in the future.
One key difference between cost accounting and financial accounting is that while in financial accounting the cost is classified depending on the type of transaction, cost accounting classifies costs according to information needs of the management.
Types of Cost Accounting

 

  • Standard Cost Accounting

This type of cost accounting uses ratios to compare efficient uses of labor and materials to produce goods or services under standard conditions. Assessing these differences is called a variance analysis. Traditional cost accounting essentially allocates cost based on one measure, labor or machine hours. Due to the fact that overhead cost has risen proportionate to labor cost since the genesis of standard cost accounting, allocating overhead cost as an overall cost has ended up producing occasionally misleading insights.

 

  • Activity Based Costing

An approach to the costing and monitoring of activities which involves tracing resource consumption and costing final outputs, resources assigned to activities, and activities to cost objects based on consumption estimates.
Activity based costing accumulates the overheads from each department and assigns them to specific cost objects like services, customers, or products. The way these costs are assigned to cost objects are first decided in an activity analysis, where appropriate output measures are cost drivers. As result, activity based costing tends to be much more accurate and helpful when it comes to helping managers understand the cost and profitability of their company’s specific services or products. Accountants using activity based costing will pass out a survey to employees who will then account for the amount of time they spend on different tasks. This gives management a better idea of where their time and money is being spent.

 

  • Lean Accounting

Most accounting practices for manufacturing work off the assumption that whatever is being produced is done in a large scale. Instead of using standard costing, activity based costing, cost-plus pricing, or other management accounting systems, when using lean accounting those methods are replaced by value-based pricing and lean-focused performance measurements

 

  • Marginal Costing

Considered a simplified model of cost accounting, marginal costing is an analysis of the relationship between a product or service’s sales price, the volume of sales, the amount produced, expenses, costs and profits. That specific relationship is called the contribution margin.This type of analysis can be used by management to gain insight on potential profits as impacted by changing costs, what types of sales prices to establish, and types of marketing campaigns.

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What is Bookkeeping ?

If you’re running a business, it doesn’t matter whether you’re an independent contractor or a growing company, managing accounts payable is a key part of your everyday business administration. Accounts payable is the process of tracking money owed by your business to suppliers. As your business grows, so does the complexity of your accounts payable process.

 

The term bookkeeping means different things to different people:

  • Some people think that bookkeeping is the same as accounting. They assume that keeping a company’s books and preparing its financial statements and tax reports are all part of bookkeeping.
  • Others see bookkeeping as limited to recording transactions in journals or daybooks and then posting the amounts into accounts in ledgers. After the amounts are posted, the bookkeeping has ended and an accountant with a college degree takes over. The accountant will make adjusting entries and then prepare the financial statements and other reports.
  • At mid-size and larger corporations the term bookkeeping might be absent. Often corporations have accounting departments staffed with accounting clerks who process accounts payable, accounts receivable, payroll, etc. The accounting clerks will be supervised by one or more accountants.

 

Bookkeeping (and accounting) involves the recording of a company’s financial transactions. The transactions will have to be identified, approved, sorted and stored in a manner so they can be retrieved and presented in the company’s financial statements and other reports.

 

Some of a company’s financial transactions:

  • The purchase of supplies with cash.
  • The purchase of merchandise on credit.
  • The sale of merchandise on credit.
  • Rent for the business office.
  • Salaries and wages earned by employees.
  • Buying equipment for the office.
  • Borrowing money from a bank.

 

The transactions will be sorted into perhaps hundreds of accounts including Cash, Accounts Receivable, Loans Payable, Accounts Payable, Sales, Rent Expense, Salaries Expense, Wages Expense Dept 1, Wages Expense Dept 2, etc. The amounts in each of the accounts will be reported on the company’s financial statements in detail or in summary form.

 

Start a daily regimen of entering incoming bills. If you incur a business credit card expense, enter it on the same day. Employee expenses should also be entered. Don’t forget to keep and securely store paper copies of all your documents too.Make a habit of paying your bills on a weekly basis and establish a window of payment that aligns with your supplier’s terms. If their terms are 30 days, don’t wait the 30 days to pay them; mail out the check or make the direct deposit payment a few days in advance of the deadline. This way you’ll maintain good relations with your vendors.

 

It’s inevitable that there will be times when cash flow is tight and paying bills on time can be challenging, be proactive. Refer back to all your suppliers’ terms to see if their payment windows allow for any wiggle room. If you know you can’t cover a payment this month, call your supplier and be honest: tell them you’ll make a minimum payment this month, and X amount next month until it’s paid off. While it’s not an ideal situation, and you may have to pay interest, it demonstrates to the supplier that you are proactive and serious about making payments. If you have a strong record of past payments, remind them of that fact and do whatever you can to reassure them of your business viability.

 

If your accounting system is taking up too much of your time, then you may want to enlist an assistant to help with some basic bookkeeping, or hire or outsource to an accountant. As your business grows, you might even want to consider the services full time .

 

 

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Financial Planning process

Financial Planning is the process of estimating the capital required and determining it’s competition. It is the process of framing financial policies in relation to procurement, investment and administration of funds of a company.

Capital requirements  will depend upon factors like cost of current and fixed assets, promotional expenses and long- range planning. Capital requirements have to be looked with both aspects: short- term and long- term requirements. The capital structure is the composition of capital, i.e., the relative kind and proportion of capital required in the business. This includes decisions of debt- equity ratio- both short-term and long- term. Framing financial policies with regards to cash control, lending, borrowings, etc. A finance manager ensures that the scarce financial resources are maximally utilized in the best possible manner at least cost in order to get maximum returns on investment.

Financial planning is process of framing objectives, policies, procedures, programmes and budgets regarding the financial activities of a concern. This ensures effective and adequate financial and investment policies.

The importance of Financial planning

  • Adequate funds have to be ensured.
  • Financial Planning helps in ensuring a reasonable balance between outflow and inflow of funds so that stability is maintained.
  • Financial Planning ensures that the suppliers of funds are easily investing in companies which exercise financial planning.
  • Financial Planning helps in making growth and expansion programmes which helps in long-run survival of the company.
  • Financial Planning reduces uncertainties with regards to changing market trends which can be faced easily through enough funds.
  • Financial Planning helps in reducing the uncertainties which can be a hindrance to growth of the company. This helps in ensuring stability an d profitability in concern.

 

The financial planning professional informs the client about the financial planning process, the services the financial planning professional offers, and the financial planning professional’s competencies and experience. The financial planning professional and the client determine whether the services offered by the financial planning professional and his or her competencies meet the needs of the client. The financial planning professional considers his or her skills, knowledge and experience in providing the services requested or likely to be required by the client. The financial planning professional determines if he or she has, and discloses, any conflict of interest. The financial planning professional and the client agree on the services to be provided.